Homemade power feeder

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I recently had torip a whole lot of material where a power feederwas a handy thing to have, so I improvised onewith just a drill and a rod and a roller skatewheelie on the end of it, with a block like thisto guide it.

But then in the next stepI had to actually cut the wood like this and that contraptionwasn't going to work so I came up with thiscontraption which I could mount vertically againstthe sacrificial fence.

This one actually hasan adjustment knob where I can adjust how hardit pushes down on the wheel but even so this was slappedtogether other quickly so I thought I'd makea better version of it but I'm going to reuseparts of this one.

I got a bunch of differentroller skate wheels here and the question is whichof these is the grippiest? If I just put a piece of woodin between these two, I can see that this oneslides and this one doesn't.

But the red oneseems grippiest of all because this one slides,this one doesn't.

I have no use forthe bearings in this one, and these arereally cheap bearings too.

So I have to mount thaton this shaft somehow.

I roughened up the end ofthat shaft rather imprecisely and now I needa slightly undersized hole in the block of wood.

And now I just need tomake this fit on the wheel The last little bit justbroke off from fitting this over and over again but overall this works pretty good.

Now I just need to screw it on somehow.

So this is my new drive wheelwhich hopefully is even grippier than the old one.

And in the old one I just have the shaftgoing into the slot where I can move up and down.

And then this part here just pressed it down.

It all runs at very low speed so this hasn't been a problembut I think it would be better if the shaft actuallyjust turned in a hole and that part moved up and downinstead of a slot in this part.

I drilled that a little bitoversized and even tilted it on the drill because as thispart moves up and down, it has to pivot in the hole.

Now to push this down, I'm figuring to have thiscarriage pulled in here like that and that will give me lotsof range of adjustment for how high this goes.

I just need a slot right here.

This block is gonna pivotlike this and I'll put the pivot holeright here.

It's gonna pivotagainst this block here.

And I want that screw holeright about here.

I can barely see that mark.

So that gives me a reasonablerange of adjustment.

Now ideally I have thissticking out a fair bit here.

And I will just reuse thewashers and the spacers I made for the last one.

And I've polishedthis part of the shaft already so that it runs smoothlyin the hole.

And I was just thinking actuallya little bit more overhang like this would be better.

So I made a longer spacer out of hardwood.

Put that in here like that.

So now with thisgoing up and down, I want to have a pivot forthis shaft here so I'm not stressing outthe drill chuck here.

And I need to haveenough room for the drill even if this is all the way up.

So that means I shouldpivot right about here, like this.

So these holesneed to be quite slack so that this shaft can tiltby quite a lot.

Now I don't want thispart falling out when there's no drillattached so I'm going to put a couple of washers in hereand I made this little collar for the last oneand then just reusing that and there's a couple of screwson there that make it tight on the shaft.

Now I got to decidewhich of these drills I'm going to optimize it for.

These are both brushless drills and they both regulate the speedvery well even at low speeds so if I just push thetrigger down a little bit and then grab the chuck, it just reallycranks up the power because both of these havea little computer inside, whereas a drill like this,if I run it very slow, and then grab the chuck, it has no power at all.

And the other advantage of these brushless drillsis they're very efficient at low speeds.

So this one I started it with this batterypack not even freshly charged and I did over 300 feetof baseboard with that, running it through manytimes, hours on end running, drill never got warmand only towards the end did I drain the battery.

So if you try to do that with one of these drills evenif you solve the speed problem they're inefficient at lowspeed you drain the battery, you probably burn out the drillbecause you don't cool very well at low speeds.

With these ones it doesn't matter becausethey're so efficient, they hardly need any coolingwhen they're running very slow.

Now this drill hasthis annoying habit, if you push the trigger straightfor probably about five minutes, it just stops, I don't know ifthis one has the same problem so I'm gonna do a test.

Okay, that was about fiveminutes for this one.

Let's see how longthis one goes.

So it's now been ten minutesand this one's still going, so I'm guessing thatthis one doesn't have this anti-easy feature.

And the air blowing out of itis still cool so I'm pretty sure this one isalso very efficient at low speed although I would have probablypreferred to use this one for the motor for my powerfeeder because I don't actually like using this as a drill,it's just way too big and heavy.

Now I need somethingto keep the drill from flipping over like this ifit's turning in that direction so I'm just gonna reuse thispart that I made for the old one and screw it on right here.

One thing that was annoying withusing this drill is every time I turn it onI had to set my speed again, which is why I made thisclamp here and on that one, I can set what speedI want on it and I just put that on thereand I have my speed and if I want it off,I take it off and then if I to put it back onI have the same speed again.

The only thing left to dois to try it out.

I don't actually want thewheel to come down this far so I'm just gonnastick a lock in here.

And I still getsome coupling that way.

Oops.

Unfortunately this drill,at the lowest speeds, has a bit of wavinesswith how it runs.

That can be bad, let's see howit does with the cove cut.

Not as badas I thought it would be.

Let's give it a few more passes.

Well it is very consistentbut not a finished surface.

And after a minute of handsanding, it feels really smooth and the cut marksare just about gone.

You can still see someright here.

So that's my simple minimalhomemade power feeder.

I could, of course, try to makesomething more sophisticated with two rollers so I could havean in-feed and an out-feed roller or something witha gear head motor and a whole bunch ofwooden gears to reduce it to the right speed but I don'tneed a power feeder very often and I think this willserve me just fine.

Oh, and one more thing on my firstone I put the shaft in here at a slight angle so thatas I feed material like this it pushes it awaytowards the fence.

Well the problem is I realizedthat was counterproductive because half the timeI was feeding it this way depending on what tool I was usingso it makes much more sense to have this shaft instraight and just angle the whole power feeder toforce it against the fence.